Category Archives: Vegetables

Our salad bar

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Yes. I am gloating a little bit.  There is a little lettuce plant growing by the compost bucket in the middle of the bed, one growing in the bed by the wall and a couple growing on the ground outside the bed.  We’ll be eating lettuce until we turn green.

Don’t hate.

 

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Filed under Asparagus, Lettuce, Vegetables

Asparagus

I took a picture of the new asparagus bed. But, right now it’s just dirt.

The old bed has been swallowed up by honeysuckle and overshadowed by a mimosa tree.  It was never as enthusiastic a producer as I had hoped. And when I finally looked up how to grow asparagus in NC clay instead of taking the advice of someone gardening in another part of the state, I learned that asparagus likes sandy soil that drains well.  I had essentially planted it so that it would drown.

Lowe’s has Mary Washington crowns for sale, 5 in a box.  I bought 5 boxes and returned 2.  15 crowns seem well spaced in the 40″ X 87″ bed.  I put 2 bags of mushroom compost on top of them.  Since the beds are raised, drainage isn’t going to be a problem.

Chuck planted lettuce in the 5″ x 6″ holes around the outside edge.
this is what potential asparagus looks like

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Filed under Asparagus, planting

Planting – April, 2015

I started Beauregard sweet potatoes a couple of months ago and have put 3 slips in my raised bed this morning.  I put 3 eyes of a Yukon Gold Irish potato in the other end.  I stuck the rest of the eyes in empty-ish places along the iris/blueberry fence row.

I had already planted nasturtium seeds in the holes in the cinder blocks along one long and one short side..

5 Arkansas Little Leaf climbing cucumbers have  gone in the center holes on the other long side.  6 bush cucumbers have gone in the other holes, 3 at each end.  One of the Arkansas Little Leafs didn’t sprout.  But the Mexican Sour Gherkins are volunteering in their holes.  I have 4 bamboo poles in holes and I have a bottom row of string ready for the cukes to begin climbing.

DSC05614I have pulled my carrots so I can plant 2 rows of the Glass Corn popcorn seeds I managed to produce last year.  I’ve put them in the middle of that bed.  The garlic needs to grow another month or so, so I’m leaving it alone.  I”ll put the jalapenos in there when they are bigger.  There are 4 spindly plants in little pots, right now.

Chuck’s carrots are bigger and more consistent, so I’ll make a huge dessert this afternoon with my multicolored ones.  I hope they keep the colors when they cook.  Purple okra doesn’t.

DSC05619 DSC05620The sunchokes are coming up like crazy, so the bees should have a nice treat this Fall.

Roses and kiwis are putting out new growth.

Dill seeds are sprouting in the herb bed.

Columbines are blooming in the front.

We have bitty plums forming and one peach.

Lilacs will not be blooming this year.  Their buds froze.

Iris buds are popping up,  And one has even opened.

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Filed under Irises, Kiwis, Peach, planting, Plum, Root Vegetables, sunchokes, Sweet potatoes, White potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

I have started my sweet potato slips for 2015.

I always have some “fingerling” sweet potatoes left over from a harvest. In 2013, I was able to bake them and have 5 cups of sweet potato ready to use later.  In 2014, the harvest was slim and there were only a half a dozen.

As I left them lying around waiting for an inspiration for what to do with them, one started to sprout.  So, I stuck it in a jar of water with some toothpicks and it is making green.  When they are 3 of 4 inches tall, I’ll pop them off the potato and straight into the water to form roots.  Then, I’ll have them ready for planting after the last frost.

Now, the rest have little sproutlets.  I wonder who I can give them to.

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Mexican Sour Gherkins

I have decided that the cucumbers that look like teensy watermelons have to be eaten fresh or made into sour/dill  pickles.  They just don’t work with sugar.

Pickles

The jar on the right is dill pickles.

The jar on the left is sweet pickle raisins that are too hard to use in anything.  I tried simply pouring boiling sweet pickle solution over them rather than going through the “tenderizing” procedure that ordinary cucumbers require.  That was no more effective than using the original method I learned from my grandmother.

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Filed under Cucumbers

New Seeds

From Sow True:

Delicata Winter Squash

Dwarf Blue Curl Scotch Kale

Brandywine Yellow Tomato

Spring Rapini Broccoli Raab

From Southern Exposure Seed Exchange:

Yellow Pear Tomato

Arkansas Little Leaf Pickling Cucumber

And I have planted Georgia Southern Collard seeds from Botanical Interests.

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Filed under Broccoli, Collards, Cucumbers, Kale, planting, Squash, Tomatoes

Cucumbers

I don’t really care for fresh cucumbers.  I don’t hate ’em.  There is no spit-that-out-it’s-nasty reaction.  I just tend to eat around them in salads.  But, I do love them pickled.  My paternal grandmother’s sweet pickles  are the best in the world, hands down.  But, pickling in general is a new trick I am learning.

I have a coworker who is a pickling god and he has inspired me to experiment.  I have pickled jalapeños and banana peppers and those have turned out well.  (Equal parts vinegar and water, boiling poured into jars stuffed with peppers, lidded and flipped over to seal as they cool.)

A couple of years ago, I saw pictures online of some bitty cucumbers that look like thumb-size watermelons.  On investigation, I learned that they are called Mexican sour gherkins.  I got a packet of seeds and Chuck put them in one of the raised beds this summer.

Two important things to know about these cucumbers.  One, they are climbers.  Two, they will consume your garden given half a chance. They tried to eat the bed they were in and when I tried to lift them up to some bamboo poles that Ursula brought me, they were putting out extra roots.  Next year, they get something to climb on from the beginning.

When I tried pickling them, I didn’t take the tininess into consideration.  I turned them into sweet pickle raisins.  And, no, you cannot use those little rocks for anything.  I think that if I will put boiling sweet pickle solution on them and leave them a little while, they will work.

I did make dill pickles with them and they are tasty.  I stuck a couple of cloves of garlic in a couple of half pint jars that I had filled with whole cucumbers, shook about a tablespoon of dried dill in each one and poured boiling 50% vinegar over them.  A couple of weeks later, I took a jar to my dad and we tried them out.

Yum.

 

 

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Filed under Cucumbers, Preserving