Category Archives: hazelnuts

Hazelnuts

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I think this is about a quarter of the nuts that we will get from our bushes. The rest are still green.

I think we need to plant some straight into the ground around the rest of the border of the labyrinth. It looks like they do best when messed with the least.

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Tastiness abounding

We have tomatoes galore.  I have canned 2 pints of Romas and have been eating Bulgarians on sandwiches.  I have used the Russian Black Tulas in salads.  And we have been eating the cherry tomatoes jut as snacks.

I love summer.

We planted less okra this year, so we are only eating it every 3 or 4 days.  I think this means we are less likely to get foundered on them.

The sweet potatoes are healthy with one potato trying to peek out of the dirt.

The turmeric is healthy.

A friend had a piece of ginger starting to grow a root.  I traded it for a piece of ginger that I bought withOUT a root growing and it put out green in about a week.

We have apples ripening.  The lovely red is visible from inside the house.

I think I got the second planting of Yukon Golds in the ground too late.  The first planting froze and the second has hardly any green.

There are nuts on 3 or 4 of the hazelnut bushes.  The rest appear to be males.  Dammit.

The berries are done.  It was a great year for them and I am sated.

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Filed under Apples, Ginger and Turmeric, hazelnuts, Okra, Sweet potatoes, Tomatoes, White potatoes

Checking on the fruit

We had a couple of nasty ice storms, this winter, and some nights of single digits, too.  So, we lost  some winter crops in the raised beds and a Bradford pear tree at the end of the driveway.  I don’t regret the loss of the fruitless pear.  I know they grow fast and are a boon to contractors, but I think I fruit tree that won’t bear is a waste of space.   Because we lost that Bradford, I’m hoping the real pear I planted in that tree line will have a better chance this year.

It had a tall spike of a trunk.  I cut it out a couple of days ago so that it would aim its growth outward, where I can actually reach any fruit that survives the deer.  I dipped it in some rooting hormone and then in a pot of good, composty dirt.  I don’t really expect to get a tree from it, but it didn’t cost me anything to try.

The Santa Rosa plum, to the right of the front door is covered in blossoms.  The elephant heart plum by the driveway, isn’t as full, but still looks promising.  The peach has blossoms, too.  The apples have no buds, yet.  The sour cherry had buds all over, but nothing has actually opened.

The kiwis are still dormant and the passionfruit is, too.  But, there are buds all over all the blueberries.

The crabapple tree is covered in young leaves, not fully emerged, and I don’t see any flower buds.  That tree has never bloomed.  How does a crabapple never bloom?  I’ve never seen such a thing in my life.  And I got it to pollinate an apple tree that has since died and been replaced by two others, so I really find the lack of blossoms ridiculous.

Spring is creeping in and I am loving it.

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Filed under Apples, Blueberries, Cherry, Fruit and berries, hazelnuts, Kiwis, orchard, Passionfruit, Peach, Pear, Timing

Garden Update

Been a while since I last posted here. There has been mostly eating, though the summer returns have been a bit sporadic. The early excessive heat and the inconsistent rain has had it’s effect on production. The summer squash finally ran it’s course and I was pretty much ready. I was a bit tired of it. I expect that I will not plant so much of it next spring. We are into Fall and Winter planting right now and I have added two new beds. Lowes had self-contained kits on sale made of cedar, so I thought I would give them a try. I have planted buckwheat in one for the bees to forage during the slow season.

They have been a bit slow in finding it, but have been more interested lately.  Kitty pulled the feeders from the hives about a week ago.  We are watching to see how they do now that Goldenrod is plentiful and they have Buckwheat just outside their front doors.  This morning I planted more Buckwheat in the mulch between five of the Hazelnut bushes just to see if it will sprout there.  If so, I will plant more.  It grows quickly and lasts until the first frost and is supposed to be a great green compost.

Moving on to the new stuff.  Last month I planted Butternut and Spaghetti squash in the other new bed.  It is about to take over the yard.  There is already fruit and many blossoms.  I tend to prefer the winter squash varieties over the summer.

In the bed beside the Buckwheat, I have planted carrots, beets and turnips.  In the bed beside the squash, I have planted cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli.  In the other upper bed I have planted three varieties of kale.  That bed still has thriving chard and a leftover okra plant that is still producing.

In the last lower bed I have planted lettuce, arugula and spinach.  Yesterday I planted peas in the cinder block holes along one whole side of that bed.  The rest of the okra plants doing fine and I expect them to keep producing for a few more weeks.  I have also planted Parsnips in the half of the cinder block holes in that bed.
We had mixed results with tomatoes.  The corner bed away from the raised beds produced wonderful German Johnsons and some very tasty Cherokee Purples, but the plants in the beds seemed to wilt in the early heat.  We are still enjoying tomatoes and have been able to share with family and friends.
I planted Buckwheat in some of the other beds.  The one below is where the cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli have been planted.  You can see the greyish leaves of the returning brussel sprouts plants that I just cut back in the middle of the summer.  I am a bit concerned that the Buckwheat will impair the sprouting of the new stuff.
Anyway, that’s pretty much it for now.

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Filed under Arugula, Bees, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chard, hazelnuts, Kale, Lettuce, Okra, planting, Root Vegetables, Spinach, Squash, Tomatoes, Vegetables

Hazels

I ordered fifty root stock hazelnut bushes/trees from Mark Shepard about two months ago. I cannot remember where I found his link, but I think I stumbled upon the blog first. I came up with the idea to plant a hedge of hazelnuts around the outside of the labyrinth. I emailed Mark and he agreed that hedging is a great way to grow hazels and the project was on. My hazel sticks came this past Friday and I started getting them in the ground on Saturday. Most were planted Sunday through Tuesday. We have much quartz in our yard and it was not an easy task. I mulched them all yesterday.

It took 43 of them, planted four feet apart, to get around the labyrinth. The extra seven were planted in spare nursery pots as back-up in case some don’t make it. Any of the potted ones I don’t need I plan to give away to friends.

The big surprise was how quickly they they came to life. They came as sticks with varying degrees of root attached. I planted them in compost to give them a good head start and they responded wonderfully. Many started leafing out within 24 to 48 hours after they went into the ground.

They supposedly flower in early Spring, and though they are wind pollinated, Gunther Hauk says that bees use them to forage…win, win. Speaking of sticks. We also have Paw Paws. We started with one a couple of years ago and learned last year that a grove works best and so we bought four more. They are also doing well this Spring. All are well leafed out and are planted back in the trees where they do best.

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Filed under hazelnuts, planting