Bug Spray

18359425_237907043279998_7056021334428997181_o

It’s about to be Japanese Beetle season. I found this on FaceBook.

An addition from John Snippe: Add a tablespoon of soap to that (even use it to replace the oil, actually)… and it will work better with crushed fresh garlic. Oh, and add a teaspoon of cheyenne pepper… anti- snails/slugs and nibblers.

Leave a comment

Filed under odds&ends

Our salad bar

P1030270

Yes. I am gloating a little bit.  There is a little lettuce plant growing by the compost bucket in the middle of the bed, one growing in the bed by the wall and a couple growing on the ground outside the bed.  We’ll be eating lettuce until we turn green.

Don’t hate.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Asparagus, Lettuce, Vegetables

Done!

IMG_0003 (2)

Today, this bed holds the wild dogwood I transplanted from a friend’s yard, a rice paper bush, a cloned dogwood from the National Phenology Network, some bearded irises, some white dwarf crested irises, some Asiatic lilies, a couple of Eastern columbines, 4 varieties of hellebores/Lenten roses, a small patch of cranesbill, a Bigleaf magnolia, one tea bush, a bear’s breeches, a Daphne odora, 2 kinds of ivy, a Japanese maple, a red camellia, 5 mums and I sowed seeds for 2 heights of zinnias, portulaca and impatiens today.

Leave a comment

Filed under Annuals, Flowers, Irises, Perennials, planting, tea

Front bed

The largest part of this year’s yard project is done. Grass is out; mulch is in. Tea bushes are transplanted.  I hope moving hasn’t killed them. I need to get the cover weeds out of the older part of the bed so we can mulch there, too. We used a thick layer of mulch to kill the grass there and it was effective. But, that mulch has turned into dirt and needs refreshing.

I moved the Euonymus that I had planted in that bed to the back yard where the deer can’t get to it. It’s supposed to be a bush but, right now, it’s a stick because it was snacked on heavily last summer. But, it’s not dead as evidenced by the leaves popping out. So, I have hope.

Our Japanese maple was accidentally mutilated by some yard guys who were taking down dead chunks of the maple on the corner of our lot.  After some consideration, I got a new tree.  The mutilated one was in too much sun and looked like crap for most of the summer. So, we finished the job the yard guys started and put a new tree in the front Partial Shade bed.

I found parts of a man’s shoe and a patch of nails while I was digging the grass out.  And I’m constantly amazed at the amount of quartz that grows in our ground.

 This is our most prolific crop.

Leave a comment

Filed under Flowers, odds&ends, planting, tea

Asparagus

I took a picture of the new asparagus bed. But, right now it’s just dirt.

The old bed has been swallowed up by honeysuckle and overshadowed by a mimosa tree.  It was never as enthusiastic a producer as I had hoped. And when I finally looked up how to grow asparagus in NC clay instead of taking the advice of someone gardening in another part of the state, I learned that asparagus likes sandy soil that drains well.  I had essentially planted it so that it would drown.

Lowe’s has Mary Washington crowns for sale, 5 in a box.  I bought 5 boxes and returned 2.  15 crowns seem well spaced in the 40″ X 87″ bed.  I put 2 bags of mushroom compost on top of them.  Since the beds are raised, drainage isn’t going to be a problem.

Chuck planted lettuce in the 5″ x 6″ holes around the outside edge.
this is what potential asparagus looks like

Leave a comment

Filed under Asparagus, planting

Raspberries

In 2013, Marty gave us some black raspberry canes.  They have pretty much crowded out the wild blackberries that were growing at the edge of our treeline.

This year, I found yellow raspberries for sale at Lowe’s and I bought one.

I was digging up black raspberries to share with coworkers and mentioned that to my friend, Patti, who lives in Williamsburg, Virginia.  She had just been given some thornless raspberries by a Garden Club friend.  We arranged a trade.  Hers came to her from Vermont.  We assume they are red.

I am really hoping to have all 3 colors producing in a year or 2.

Leave a comment

Filed under Black Raspberries

Hamby pole beans!!

My Nanny (paternal grandmother) was a constant gardener. She canned or preserved anything she had enough of to put in a jar. When my uncle was situated with a yard big enough to plant in, he followed her example. His uncle, her brother, used to get bean seeds from a local general store to send to his nephew in Nashville, TN.

When Nanny died, we pulled out all the things she had put by and everybody got an equal portion. Except, she had taught me how to make pickles. So, I traded my pickles for quarts of beans. And had no more for 2 decades.

Four years ago, I called that general store to see if they still carried Hamby bean seeds. My uncle’s garden was gone as his dementia progressed and his uncle had been gone almost as long as his sister. And they do. They don’t usually sell the little hobby garden size package, but they sold me a quarter pound of seeds. They weren’t (maybe still aren’t) set up to take a credit card. So, they sent the seeds to me with a bill enclosed, trusting me to send a check back to them.

(Of course I did. Shut up.)

My dad, never a gardener, has been delighted with the flavor of his past, when I share.

Hambys are pole beans and have a fairly short production period. But, they put out like crazy for for the 3 or 4 weeks they do put out. They are a great, meaty bean and the seeds turn lavender when you cook them.

We have 4 tepees this year and this is our first harvest.

ello-xhdpi-f930e5fa

Yes. I’m bragging. Whatever.

Leave a comment

Filed under odds&ends